Making room for the bigger things

If you’ve ever given much thought to ‘Life’s big decisions’ and our possible thought processes behind them, you will realise that they consume a lot of time and energy and often leave us feeling blurgh.

Whether it’s buying a house, deciding to have a baby, embarking on a new career or breaking free of contact with someone who you no longer feel very close to, the level of extremeness for each of these decisions differs greatly from person to person, and this article from the Conversation AU looks into possible reasons for this, and also looks into reasons behind regret.

Sometimes even the smallest decisions are difficult. Maybe you ordered something online and it wasn’t quite what you had hoped for when you received it? Do you send it back or adjust whatever you had planned to use it for to suit accordingly? If there are free returns, this can be an easy choice, but what if there aren’t or if you only have a limited time to make a choice?

Whether we realise it or not, these small life decisions can have a big impact on us and take up a lot of space in our minds.

I have heard of many situations of people trying to limit the number of decisions they make each day, which is an interesting idea in itself. Take Mark Zuckerberg for example; he wears the same outfit every day so that he doesn’t have to think about what he should wear each morning. Seems a bit strange, but upon further thought it actually makes a lot of sense!

By clearing out the clutter, there is more room remaining for the bigger things, like running a social media empire, right Zuck?

Weighing it up

For all decisions contemplated, there is always another way to go about it. A lot of the time that option is to keep doing things the way they are done, which is what people often choose. This option is comfortable, easy, and unless there is something more to look forward to with the other, why not just keep doing things the way they are?

To me, this is not an option. I like to decide by weighing up the pro’s and con’s by making a list; you should try it – forming a range of points for each side really helps to analyse the situation. When something is taking up a lot of head space, and it is difficult to focus on anything else because the answer is not immediately clear, the ‘List’ comes in very handy.

Big life decisions also come with lessons learned. Now in my early thirties, I have made my fair share of these, but I am aware that there are still plenty more to come.

Supporting a movement

Decisions also come with supporting movements and choosing what to stand behind. What do you want to invest your time believing?

Earlier this month (March 8) was International Women’s Day, a day where the achievements of women are recognised and celebrated. Since entering the corporate workforce in 2013, I have noticed as this day has become more widely celebrated each year, which can only be a good thing. As inequalities continue to exist, we have to appreciate and strive towards more activism in this space, which is precisely what this day acknowledges.

An appropriate level of rush

Last week I made the decision to venture into the city for the first time in a year. It was a big deal for me, which after so long at home I was quite excited by. Not because I was desperate to get back to the office but because I missed the morning commute, the food, the faces and experiencing something different every day. As you know, I have been enjoying my new routine, spending a whole lot more time at home with my husband and my dog. I sat on the early morning train watching passers-by and reflecting on how much things had changed in this past year. I also thought of the city rush I was about to experience, although I was expecting it to be much quieter than when I had last been there. I was keen to experience the city as it ‘wakes up‘, with less urgency and a slower pace.

For old times’ sake, I really wanted to have a true Melbourne style day; I wanted to get a nice coffee in a café down an alleyway, eat a bagel for lunch and window shop, then return to my desk to admire the view of the city, which is exactly what I did. I don’t know when or how often I’ll go back in, but now that I have done it, it doesn’t seem like such a big deal. Don’t get me wrong, I think there needs to be a balance and that organisations have (or should have) learned a great deal from the pandemic. If an employer doesn’t see that their staff can be both happy and productive at home, I don’t know what they have learned, or what decisions they have been making over the past few months.

It’s been a busier time for me than usual, not that I have minded. I still think it’s very important to take it easy and enjoy life at the slower pace many of us have grown used to, but every now and then a level of rush can be invigorating. However, we must recognise that there is a decision there, and we need to figure out what levels of rush we want in our lives. This can be done by reflecting on the long-term impacts which although may not be immediate, are ultimately worth considering.